Saturday, August 16, 2008

Tough Luck in Leadville.

After much, much training, Andy was pulled at Leadville for time at an aid station. Candi called me at about 10:30 p.m. EDT and gave me the news. It was the altitude. He'd had only two training sessions at altitude, and knew that that might be his undoing. Apparently, the lack of oxygen at 10,000 feet is a greater foe than streams and rocks and lots and lots of miles. But hear this: he did not quit. Andy doesn't have anything to prove, and he's got every right in the world to coast a bit. But I bet he won't. So, what's that mean? 411 days in the slam?

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

You're still my hero!

GFan

Roger said...

A-Man,

I left Denver late Saturday afternoon and drove up to Mt. Evans (Silverton was too far away for me to make and still get my flight home). I stood at the top sucking in the paltry amount of oxygen at 14,000+ feet and looked west. I figured you were around Hope pass, and I know I could see it but I couldn't tell which mountain was which. The weather was nasty and I worried...

Lot's of your friends that have watched this unfold, and followed your blog, for the past year were watching as well. You've inspired people to push their limits and that's a cool thing. Keep rockin A-man...

Just me said...

Well said, Roger!

Through rain, hail, sleet, snow, an aching foot and the inability to take a normal breath, Andy kept going. He's a strong man. Aman, we're proud of you!

Star said...

Andy...I thought about you all night and then had a dream that you were *one of three runners* to finish Leadville. (More on that dream later). Clearly in my mind, you reached your goal...I wouldn't have even had the cojones to attempt Leadville, especially in hail AND snow :)

You are truly an inspiration!

Lynne said...

Andy would never quit.

And SuperD, thank you for doing a remarkable job and keeping us informed about the race.

superdave524 said...

You're welcome (and thank you, Candi).